16 May 2014

Fiber

*FIBER*


Also known as roughage or bulk, includes all parts of plant foods that your body can't digest or absorb. Unlike other food components, such as fats, proteins or 
carbohydrates which your body breaks down and absorbs fiber isn't digested by your body. Instead, it passes relatively intact through your stomach, small intestine, colon 
and out of your body. A slowly eaten meal will enter the absorptive phase of the gastrointestinal tract more slowly than a rapidly eaten meal of similar composition. Many of 
the differences between low and high glycemic foods would disappear if a meal was eaten slowly. The chemical and physico-chemical nature (lipid, protein, carbohydrate) of 
the meal will also influence the gastric emptying of the food multiphase system. Fatty foods and hypertonic solutions empty slowly. The movement of food, i.e., chyme, 
along the gastrointestinal tract is typical of flow in a disperse system. As chyme moves along the gastrointestinal tract, polymer flow and diffusion becomes important.
Fibre is an important part of a healthy diet. A diet high in fibre has many health benefits. It can help prevent heart disease, diabetes, weight gain and some cancers, and can 
also improve digestive health. However, many people don't get enough fibre. On average, most people in the UK get about 14g of fibre a day. You should aim for at least 18g 
a day. Fibre is only found in foods that come from plants. Foods such as meat, fish and dairy products don't contain any fibre.


Fiber is commonly classified as soluble (it dissolves in water) or insoluble (it doesn't dissolve):
-Soluble fiber. This type of fiber dissolves in water to form a gel-like material. It can help lower blood cholesterol and glucose levels. Soluble fiber is found in oats, peas, 
beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots, barley and psyllium.
-Insoluble fiber. This type of fiber promotes the movement of material through your digestive system and increases stool bulk, so it can be of benefit to those who struggle 
with constipation or irregular stools. Whole-wheat flour, wheat bran, nuts, beans and vegetables, such as cauliflower, green beans and potatoes, are good sources of 
insoluble fiber.
-Most plant-based foods, such as oatmeal and beans, contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. However, the amount of each type varies in different plant foods. To receive 
the greatest health benefit, eat a wide variety of high-fiber foods.


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